Find a local pick your own farm here!

Bean U-Pick Orchards in Northwest New Jersey in 2024, by county

Below are the U-Pick orchards and farms for beans that we know of in this area. Not all areas of any state, nor even every state, have beans orchards that are open to the public. If you know of any others, please tell us using the add a farm form!

Remember to always check with the farm's own website or Facebook page before you go - or call or email them if they don't have a website or Facebook page. Conditions at the farms and crops can change literally overnight, so if you want to avoid a wasted trip out there - check with the farm directly before you go! If I cannot reach them, I DON'T GO!

PLEASE report closed farms, broken links and incorrect info using the "Report Corrections" form below.

Hunterdon County

  • Square Stone Farm - We use natural organic practices, and are subject to the NOP small quantity exemption, beans, beets, corn (sweet), cotton, cucumbers, eggplants, flowers, herbs or spices, lavender, melons, onions, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, other vegetables, walnuts, U-pick and already picked
    1148 State Route 12, Frenchtown, NJ 8825. Phone: . Email: farmer@squarestonefarm.com. Open: Saturday, Sunday and Holidays 10 am to 4 pm, July to October; PLEASE, Check our website before coming out to the farm!. Directions: We are approximately 1 mile east of Frenchtown at the top of the hill. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, only. Square Stone Farm farmer at dot com. Picking updates: Click here for picking updates. (UPDATED: July 03, 2016)

Warren County

  • Kash Farm - Eggplant, Peppers (Red, Green, Hot), Beans, Lima Beans, Squash (Acorn, Butternut,Spring, Green, Yellow, Scallop), Tomatoes (Grape, Cherry), Brussel Sprouts, Red Cabbage, Flowering Kale, Basil, Mint, Parsley (Curly, Italian), Pumpkins
    181 Petersburg Rd., Hackettstown, NJ . Phone: (908) 852-0570. Open: Year Round, 10 am to 6 PM Thursday - Sunday, but call to see what we have to pick before coming. Click here for a map and directions. . 3 mi NW of Hackettstown; off Rt. 46,. We also have a roadside market / farm stand with Squash (yellow, green), Lima Beans, Herbs, eggplants, Cherry Tomatoes, Other Vegetables. We also have Greenhouse, Petting zoo; pot belly pigs; goats. Retail & Wholesale.
  • Kimball's Upick - Hot peppers (over 100 varieties); herbs; salad greens; lettuce; tomatoes; green peppers; cucumbers; zucchini; sunflowers; green beans; various other vegetables
    110 Sarepta Road, Belvidere, NJ . Phone: (908) 475-4473. Email: kimballsupick@comcast.net. Open: Closed to U-Pick this year - Farm Stand open. Directions: Route 46 W, approx. 1 12 miles after Route 519, make right on Sarepta Road, 1 mile N on left side. . Click here for a map and directions.
    Kimball's Upick Facebook page. . Route 46 W, approx. 1 1/2 miles after Route 519, make right on Sarepta Road, 1 mile N on left side. Click here for a map. For current updates about what is available to pick, . Assisted picking on weekends & evenings; call for alternate times at Kimball. Typical harvest dates are: Blackberries (August), Blueberries (June - July), Raspberries (July - September), Strawberries (June). Kimball's U-Pick Facebook page.
  • Race Farm - Apples; blueberries, broccoli; cabbage; pumpkins; beans (lima, snap); peppers; tomatoes; raspberries; eggplant; greens; Brussel sprouts; sunflowers
    87 Belcher Road, Blairstown, NJ . Phone: (908) 362-8151. Email: info@racefarmllc.com. Open: Daily, Apr. Directions: I-80 Exit 12, N on Route 521 go 2 2 miles, left onto Union Brick Road, follow directional signs.In addition to u-pick, there is pre-picked: Apples; pumpkins; vegetables. Our apple varieties are Cortland; Empire; Gala; Golden Delicious; Jonagold; Jonathan; Macoun; McIntosh; Red Delicious; StaymanWinesap. We also have Nursery stock; bedding plants; baked goods; pottery; WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted. . Click here for a map and directions.
    Race Farm Facebook page. . . 1 - November 30, 9 am to 6 pm; PYO opens first week in July for blueberries, and cherries, veggies and apples follow as they are ready; You can call the farm for daily picking schedules. I-80 Exit 12, N on Route 521 go 2 2 miles, left onto Union Brick Road, follow directional signs.In addition to u-pick, there is pre-picked: Apples; pumpkins; vegetables. Our apple varieties are Cortland; Empire; Gala; Golden Delicious; Jonagold; Jonathan; Macoun; McIntosh; Red Delicious; Stayman/Winesap. We also have Nursery stock; bedding plants; baked goods; pottery; WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted. Our pick your own farm, at 87 Belcher Road Blairstown, will open Saturday July 7 and will remain open daily - 9-5pm, through October 31st. We look forward to another wonderful season! Our farm stand at 224 Rt. 94 is open daily year round, as is our cafe at 155 Rt. 94 Blairstown. PICK YOUR OWN! Our pick your own opens in July (with blueberries!) and runs till October 31st. We have a wide variety of fruits and veggies for picking, through the growing season. Crops available can differ week to week, so be sure to give us a call to see what we are picking on the day you visit. Atthere is never any admission fee! Free hayrides are available on weekends in the fall and you are also welcome to pack a picnic and relax in our beautiful picnic area.At the core of the farm, is our pick your own operation, which begins in July with pick your own blueberries and vegetables and continues with apples through October. We offer fresh pressed cider, baked goods, honey and homemade soups and salads. There is nothing more rewarding for our family, than seeing your family enjoying our farm! Have fun at one of our many weekend festivals which often include food and live music in a casual country atmosphere. There are never any extra charges at the farm and all are invited to relax and spend a little stress free time an old fashioned country environment! OurMarket located at 224 Rt. 94 is open daily 9am to 6pm and offers fresh produce, flash frozen locally caught fish, local meats, dairy and eggs as well as baked goods and healthy homemade soups and prepared meals. Also available is seasonal decor. We have a wide variety of fruits and veggies for picking, through the growing season. Crops available can differ week to week, so be sure to give us a call to see what we are picking on the day you visit.Atthere is never any admission fee! Free hayrides are available on weekends in the fall and you are also welcome to pack a picnic and relax in our beautiful picnic area!
    Comments from a visitor on September 20, 2009: "The best tomatoes in the state. Peppers, eggplants, cabbage, apples, raspberries. pumpkins. They have a restroom and a picnic area. No credit cards, free hayrides. Great cider and homebaked goods. Very, very nice people and great prices. I will never go anywhere else for Jersey produce. I love it. "

 

Green Bean, Lima Bean, Shelled Beans Picking Tips, Recipes and Information

When are fresh beans available?

Beans are a warm weather crop, and won't grow much in cold soil. It takes them about 60 to 70 days from seed to harvest.

 In the U.S. beans typically peak in harvesting from June through October in the South, and in July to September in the North. But they can be ready as early as early June in many places, if the weather is good.

  

Before you leave to go to the farm:

  1. Always call before you go to the farm - it's hard to pick in a muddy field!
  2. Most growers furnish picking containers designed for beans, but they may charge you for them; be sure to call before you go to see if you need to bring containers.
  3. Bring something to drink and a few snacks; you'd be surprised how you can work up a thirst and appetite! And don't forget hats and sunscreen for the sun. Bugs usually aren't a problem, but some deet might be good to bring along if it has been rainy.

  

Tips on How to Pick Beans

Whether you pick beans from your garden or at a Pick-Your-Own farm, here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Tips on How to Pick Green Beans

  1. Most beans these days are "stringless". That refers to a string, tough filament of the bean that runs along the outside from one end to the other.  Some beans have two, one on each side; and some have one.
  2. I prefer to snap the bean off the plant just below where the stem attaches to the bean. If you do this, it will save time when you get home, because one end of the bean has already been trimmed.  But this only makes sense if you will be using, cooking, canning or freezing the beans that day. 
  3. If you won't be using the beans the same day, then break  off the bean from the plant along the thin stem that connects the bean to the plant.
  4. The beans snap off pretty easily. hence the name "snap beans".
  5. Pole beans are the easiest to pick, because, since they grow up poles or twine, you don't have to squat down or bend over!
  6. Beans are ready for harvest when the pods are plump and firm, but not yet bulging. .
  7. In your own garden, pick your beans regularly to encourage more growth and prevent the pods from becoming tough and stringy.
  8. To harvest, hold the stem of the plant with one hand and gently snap the pod with the other..

Look for string, snap or green beans that are :

  1. firm
  2. green (not yellowish - unless you're picking yellow beans!)
  3. smooth, not wrinkly on the surface - that's an old or dried out bean. Snap beans are best when the pods are firm and snap readily, but before the seeds within the pod develop. The tips should be pliable
  4. not lumpy - those lumps are the beans that are developed - that's an overripe green bean!  Of course, if you want mature beans (not including the pod) then that's a different story, but we're talking about green beans here).
  5. The beans in the photo at right are, from left:
    - old and yellowing,
    - overripe and lumpy; and
    - dried out and damaged.
  6. Avoid placing the picked beans in the sunlight any longer than necessary. It is better to put them in the shade of a tree or shed than in the car trunk or on the car seat. Cool them as soon as possible after picking. I prefer to bring a cooler with ice in it. Green Beans may be kept fresh in the refrigerator for 3 or 4 days

 

When you get home

  1. After harvesting, store your beans in the refrigerator or blanch and freeze them for longer storage.
  2. Put them in the vegetable crisper in the fridge, in a loose plastic bag.
  3. They will be good for about a week like that.

  

Bean recipes and home canning

Now, get ready to can or freeze the extra beans - It is VERY easy! Click on the links for easy instructions.

  1. How to can green beans, yellow beans, snap beans, broad beans, etc.
  2. How to make pickled beans
  3. How to freeze green beans (and other beans)
  4. How to Freeze Lima Beans, Broad beans, Butter Beans and/or Pinto Beans
  5. Canning fresh shelled beans
  6. Canned dried beans and peas (from kidney beans, peas, lima beans, broadbeans, chickpeas, pole beans, etc.)
  7. Canned Baked  Beans With Tomato or Molasses Sauce
  8. Canned Baked  Beans With Back, Pork or Ham and Tomato or Molasses Sauce -
  9. Pickled green beans
  10. Pickled Dill beans
  11. Mustard beans (pickled mustard beans)
  12. Pickled Three-Bean Salad

Varieties

There are many different types of beans, each with their own unique flavor, texture, and growing requirements. Some of the most popular varieties include:

  • Green Beans: Also known as snap beans or string beans, green beans are a classic garden staple. They can be eaten fresh or cooked and come in bush and pole varieties.
  • Lima Beans: Lima beans (called Broad Beans or Butter Beans in the UK) are a nutritious and protein-rich vegetable that can be eaten fresh or dried. They require a long growing season and prefer warm temperatures.
  • Pole Beans: Pole beans are a climbing variety of bean that require support to grow. They can reach up to 10 feet tall and have a longer growing season than bush beans.
  • Dried Beans: Dried beans are a versatile pantry staple that can be used in soups, stews, and other dishes. Popular varieties include black beans, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans
  • s, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans

Other Local Farm Products (Honey, Horses, Milk, Meat, Eggs, Etc.)
(NOT pick-your-own, unless they are also listed above)

Northwest New Jersey Bean U-Pick Orchards in !

Find a local pick your own farm here!

Bean U-Pick Orchards in Northwest New Jersey in 2024, by county

Below are the U-Pick orchards and farms for beans that we know of in this area. Not all areas of any state, nor even every state, have beans orchards that are open to the public. If you know of any others, please tell us using the add a farm form!

Remember to always check with the farm's own website or Facebook page before you go - or call or email them if they don't have a website or Facebook page. Conditions at the farms and crops can change literally overnight, so if you want to avoid a wasted trip out there - check with the farm directly before you go! If I cannot reach them, I DON'T GO!

PLEASE report closed farms, broken links and incorrect info using the "Report Corrections" form below.

Hunterdon County

  • Square Stone Farm - We use natural organic practices, and are subject to the NOP small quantity exemption, beans, beets, corn (sweet), cotton, cucumbers, eggplant, flowers, herbs or spices, lavender, melons, onions, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, other vegetables, walnuts, U-pick and already picked
    1148 State Route 12, Frenchtown, NJ 8825. Phone: . Email: farmer@squarestonefarm.com. Open: Saturday, Sunday and Holidays 10 am to 4 pm, July to October; PLEASE, Check our website before coming out to the farm!. Directions: We are approximately 1 mile east of Frenchtown at the top of the hill. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, only. Square Stone Farm farmer at dot com. Picking updates: Click here for picking updates. (UPDATED: July 03, 2016)

Warren County

  • Kash Farm - Eggplant, Peppers (Red, Green, Hot), Beans, Lima Beans, Squash (Acorn, Butternut,Spring, Green, Yellow, Scallop), Tomatoes (Grape, Cherry), Brussel Sprouts, Red Cabbage, Flowering Kale, Basil, Mint, Parsley (Curly, Italian), Pumpkins
    181 Petersburg Rd., Hackettstown, NJ . Phone: (908) 852-0570. Open: Year Round, 10 am to 6 PM Thursday - Sunday, but call to see what we have to pick before coming. Click here for a map and directions. . 3 mi NW of Hackettstown; off Rt. 46,. We also have a roadside market / farm stand with Squash (yellow, green), Lima Beans, Herbs, Eggplant, Cherry Tomatoes, Other Vegetables. We also have Greenhouse, Petting zoo; pot belly pigs; goats. Retail & Wholesale.
  • Kimball's Upick - Hot peppers (over 100 varieties); herbs; salad greens; lettuce; tomatoes; green peppers; cucumbers; zucchini; sunflowers; green beans; various other vegetables
    110 Sarepta Road, Belvidere, NJ . Phone: (908) 475-4473. Email: kimballsupick@comcast.net. Open: Closed to U-Pick this year - Farm Stand open. Directions: Route 46 W, approx. 1 12 miles after Route 519, make right on Sarepta Road, 1 mile N on left side. . Click here for a map and directions.
    Kimball's Upick Facebook page. . Route 46 W, approx. 1 1/2 miles after Route 519, make right on Sarepta Road, 1 mile N on left side. Click here for a map. For current updates about what is available to pick, . Assisted picking on weekends & evenings; call for alternate times at Kimball. Typical harvest dates are: Blackberries (August), Blueberries (June - July), Raspberries (July - September), Strawberries (June). Kimball's U-Pick Facebook page.
  • Race Farm - Apples; blueberries, broccoli; cabbage; pumpkins; beans (lima, snap); peppers; tomatoes; raspberries; eggplant; greens; Brussel sprouts; sunflowers
    87 Belcher Road, Blairstown, NJ . Phone: (908) 362-8151. Email: info@racefarmllc.com. Open: Daily, Apr. Directions: I-80 Exit 12, N on Route 521 go 2 2 miles, left onto Union Brick Road, follow directional signs.In addition to u-pick, there is pre-picked: Apples; pumpkins; vegetables. Our apple varieties are Cortland; Empire; Gala; Golden Delicious; Jonagold; Jonathan; Macoun; McIntosh; Red Delicious; StaymanWinesap. We also have Nursery stock; bedding plants; baked goods; pottery; WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted. . Click here for a map and directions.
    Race Farm Facebook page. . . 1 - November 30, 9 am to 6 pm; PYO opens first week in July for blueberries, and cherries, veggies and apples follow as they are ready; You can call the farm for daily picking schedules. I-80 Exit 12, N on Route 521 go 2 2 miles, left onto Union Brick Road, follow directional signs.In addition to u-pick, there is pre-picked: Apples; pumpkins; vegetables. Our apple varieties are Cortland; Empire; Gala; Golden Delicious; Jonagold; Jonathan; Macoun; McIntosh; Red Delicious; Stayman/Winesap. We also have Nursery stock; bedding plants; baked goods; pottery; WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted. Our pick your own farm, at 87 Belcher Road Blairstown, will open Saturday July 7 and will remain open daily - 9-5pm, through October 31st. We look forward to another wonderful season! Our farm stand at 224 Rt. 94 is open daily year round, as is our cafe at 155 Rt. 94 Blairstown. PICK YOUR OWN! Our pick your own opens in July (with blueberries!) and runs till October 31st. We have a wide variety of fruits and veggies for picking, through the growing season. Crops available can differ week to week, so be sure to give us a call to see what we are picking on the day you visit. Atthere is never any admission fee! Free hayrides are available on weekends in the fall and you are also welcome to pack a picnic and relax in our beautiful picnic area.At the core of the farm, is our pick your own operation, which begins in July with pick your own blueberries and vegetables and continues with apples through October. We offer fresh pressed cider, baked goods, honey and homemade soups and salads. There is nothing more rewarding for our family, than seeing your family enjoying our farm! Have fun at one of our many weekend festivals which often include food and live music in a casual country atmosphere. There are never any extra charges at the farm and all are invited to relax and spend a little stress free time an old fashioned country environment! OurMarket located at 224 Rt. 94 is open daily 9am to 6pm and offers fresh produce, flash frozen locally caught fish, local meats, dairy and eggs as well as baked goods and healthy homemade soups and prepared meals. Also available is seasonal decor. We have a wide variety of fruits and veggies for picking, through the growing season. Crops available can differ week to week, so be sure to give us a call to see what we are picking on the day you visit.Atthere is never any admission fee! Free hayrides are available on weekends in the fall and you are also welcome to pack a picnic and relax in our beautiful picnic area!
    Comments from a visitor on September 20, 2009: "The best tomatoes in the state. Peppers, eggplant, cabbage, apples, raspberries. pumpkins. They have a restroom and a picnic area. No credit cards, free hayrides. Great cider and homebaked goods. Very, very nice people and great prices. I will never go anywhere else for Jersey produce. I love it. "

 

Green Bean, Lima Bean, Shelled Beans Picking Tips, Recipes and Information

When are fresh beans available?

Beans are a warm weather crop, and won't grow much in cold soil. It takes them about 60 to 70 days from seed to harvest.

 In the U.S. beans typically peak in harvesting from June through October in the South, and in July to September in the North. But they can be ready as early as early June in many places, if the weather is good.

  

Before you leave to go to the farm:

  1. Always call before you go to the farm - it's hard to pick in a muddy field!
  2. Most growers furnish picking containers designed for beans, but they may charge you for them; be sure to call before you go to see if you need to bring containers.
  3. Bring something to drink and a few snacks; you'd be surprised how you can work up a thirst and appetite! And don't forget hats and sunscreen for the sun. Bugs usually aren't a problem, but some deet might be good to bring along if it has been rainy.

  

Tips on How to Pick Beans

Whether you pick beans from your garden or at a Pick-Your-Own farm, here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Tips on How to Pick Green Beans

  1. Most beans these days are "stringless". That refers to a string, tough filament of the bean that runs along the outside from one end to the other.  Some beans have two, one on each side; and some have one.
  2. I prefer to snap the bean off the plant just below where the stem attaches to the bean. If you do this, it will save time when you get home, because one end of the bean has already been trimmed.  But this only makes sense if you will be using, cooking, canning or freezing the beans that day. 
  3. If you won't be using the beans the same day, then break  off the bean from the plant along the thin stem that connects the bean to the plant.
  4. The beans snap off pretty easily. hence the name "snap beans".
  5. Pole beans are the easiest to pick, because, since they grow up poles or twine, you don't have to squat down or bend over!
  6. Beans are ready for harvest when the pods are plump and firm, but not yet bulging. .
  7. In your own garden, pick your beans regularly to encourage more growth and prevent the pods from becoming tough and stringy.
  8. To harvest, hold the stem of the plant with one hand and gently snap the pod with the other..

Look for string, snap or green beans that are :

  1. firm
  2. green (not yellowish - unless you're picking yellow beans!)
  3. smooth, not wrinkly on the surface - that's an old or dried out bean. Snap beans are best when the pods are firm and snap readily, but before the seeds within the pod develop. The tips should be pliable
  4. not lumpy - those lumps are the beans that are developed - that's an overripe green bean!  Of course, if you want mature beans (not including the pod) then that's a different story, but we're talking about green beans here).
  5. The beans in the photo at right are, from left:
    - old and yellowing,
    - overripe and lumpy; and
    - dried out and damaged.
  6. Avoid placing the picked beans in the sunlight any longer than necessary. It is better to put them in the shade of a tree or shed than in the car trunk or on the car seat. Cool them as soon as possible after picking. I prefer to bring a cooler with ice in it. Green Beans may be kept fresh in the refrigerator for 3 or 4 days

 

When you get home

  1. After harvesting, store your beans in the refrigerator or blanch and freeze them for longer storage.
  2. Put them in the vegetable crisper in the fridge, in a loose plastic bag.
  3. They will be good for about a week like that.

  

Bean recipes and home canning

Now, get ready to can or freeze the extra beans - It is VERY easy! Click on the links for easy instructions.

  1. How to can green beans, yellow beans, snap beans, broad beans, etc.
  2. How to make pickled beans
  3. How to freeze green beans (and other beans)
  4. How to Freeze Lima Beans, Broad beans, Butter Beans and/or Pinto Beans
  5. Canning fresh shelled beans
  6. Canned dried beans and peas (from kidney beans, peas, lima beans, broadbeans, chickpeas, pole beans, etc.)
  7. Canned Baked  Beans With Tomato or Molasses Sauce
  8. Canned Baked  Beans With Back, Pork or Ham and Tomato or Molasses Sauce -
  9. Pickled green beans
  10. Pickled Dill beans
  11. Mustard beans (pickled mustard beans)
  12. Pickled Three-Bean Salad

Varieties

There are many different types of beans, each with their own unique flavor, texture, and growing requirements. Some of the most popular varieties include:

  • Green Beans: Also known as snap beans or string beans, green beans are a classic garden staple. They can be eaten fresh or cooked and come in bush and pole varieties.
  • Lima Beans: Lima beans (called Broad Beans or Butter Beans in the UK) are a nutritious and protein-rich vegetable that can be eaten fresh or dried. They require a long growing season and prefer warm temperatures.
  • Pole Beans: Pole beans are a climbing variety of bean that require support to grow. They can reach up to 10 feet tall and have a longer growing season than bush beans.
  • Dried Beans: Dried beans are a versatile pantry staple that can be used in soups, stews, and other dishes. Popular varieties include black beans, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans
  • s, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans

Other Local Farm Products (Honey, Horses, Milk, Meat, Eggs, Etc.)
(NOT pick-your-own, unless they are also listed above)