Find a local pick your own farm here!

Bean U-Pick Orchards in Northeast New Jersey in 2024, by county

Below are the U-Pick orchards and farms for beans that we know of in this area. Not all areas of any state, nor even every state, have beans orchards that are open to the public. If you know of any others, please tell us using the add a farm form!

Remember to always check with the farm's own website or Facebook page before you go - or call or email them if they don't have a website or Facebook page. Conditions at the farms and crops can change literally overnight, so if you want to avoid a wasted trip out there - check with the farm directly before you go! If I cannot reach them, I DON'T GO!

PLEASE report closed farms, broken links and incorrect info using the "Report Corrections" form below.

Morris County

  • Alstede Farms - apples, apricots, beans, blackberries, blueberries, broccoli, carrots, corn (sweet), cucumbers, currants (red and black), eggplants, flowers, gooseberries, herbs or spices, melons, nectarines, onions, other berries, peas, peaches, peppers, pumpkins, raspberries (red), raspberries (Spring, red), raspberries (Autumn, red), raspberries (yellow), raspberries (Spring, yellow), raspberries (Autumn, yellow), raspberries (black), raspberries (Spring, black), raspberries (Autumn, black), summer squash, winter squash, strawberries, tomatoes, other vegetables,
    1 Alstede Farms Lane, Chester, NJ 7930. Phone: 908-879-7189. Email: info@alstedefarms.com. Open: PYO Hours: Spring & Summer: 9 am to 6 pm, Fall: 9 am to 5 pm check website to see when hours change Click here for current open hours, days and dates. Directions: . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Debit cards, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, AmEx, WIC Vouchers, SFMNP Vouchers.
    Alstede Farms Facebook page. . . PYO Hours: Spring & Summer: 9 am to 6 pm, Fall: 9 am to 5 pm (check website to see when hours change) Picking updates: Click here for picking updates. We are also a CSA, which stands for Community Supported Agriculture. The basic idea of CSA farming is a cooperative relationship between the farmer and his customers. Based on an annual commitment to one another, community members provide a pre-season payment to purchase a share of the harvest . The member then receives a weekly box of a wide variety of fresh vegetables and fruit through the growing season, harvested at the peak of ripeness and flavor. We strongly recommend purchasing tickets for all Pick Your Own (PYO) activities in advance, online, utilizing our website. We can not guarantee PYO entry for walk in guests. Any (PYO) entry ticket that is purchased at the PYO sheds will incur a $5.00 per ticket convenience fee.Click here to view our updated Pick Your Own policies.Click here to purchase advance tickets.(UPDATED: September 7, 2021, JBS) (UPDATED: April 23, 2018)
    Comments from a visitor on July 19, 2019: "Blueberries and raspberries are $6.99/lb, which is high, but Peaches are $2.79/lb is is a good price."
    Comments from a visitor on August 12, 2012: "No longer is the price $3.00 (and optional $2.00 hayride). It is $5.00 each to enter farm with $3.00 credit per person. I said I did not need hayride to bring me to the apples and peaches that i could walk myself, but price is still $5.00. Taking hayride to fruits/ veggies OR NOT it is still $5.00 (with the $3.00 credit). Pretty expensive though, spent close to $100.00 on apples and peaches.."
    Comments from a visitor on September 22, 2010: "In reply to the post from Sept 11th 2010. I agree that at first it was a little unsettling to have to pay up front for the privilege of picking my own stuff. They charge $3.00 per person for admission to the fields and an additional $2.00 per person if you want to take the hayride. The hayride is completely optional, as the orchards/berry fields are easily within walking distance of the main areas and they actually give you back the $3.00 per person as credit towards paying for whatever you picked, you just need to hand over your ticket stubs to the cashier. My $30.00 worth of apples (My 3 yr old son had to pick an apple from every tree, lol) was reduced to only $12.00 after the credit. All in all, my family and I have a great time here and we come back every year for apples and pumpkins. We highly recommend it!"
    Comments from a visitor on September 11, 2010: "We visited today to pick our own fruit, something I've done multiple times per year with my daughters since we moved here 9 years ago. Sadly we were greeted with the new policy of paying $5 per person just to go out to the fields to pick..then you pay for the lbs of fruit on top of that. Can you imagine paying $20 for some raspberries?? That's what it would have cost us if just me and my 8 year old went out to the field and filled a basket! OUCH We didn't pick fruit and we didn't stay. What you used to be a fun simple low cost place to take your children has become a money hungry pit and almost commercial like. I can understand when they want to charge for the kids to play on the blow up rentals they have or ride the ponies but WHY would you charge a customer $5 to go out to the field and pick the berries FOR YOU and then pay for them? I know there are plenty other farms that don't do that and that's a shame. Shame Shame Shame"
    Comments from a visitor on June 27, 2009: "We love this farm!"
    Comments from a visitor, May 30, 2008: "They are open all year and have a fabulous store (if you don't want to get out in the brambles and pick your own) They are kid friendly with hayrides, horse rides, festivals, corn maze. They take credit cards and have restrooms. They make their own homemade ice cream (oh boy is it good!). They have farm markets in local communities throughout central NJ. You can even cut your very own wildflowers to take home in a bouquet! :D They are a great farm in a great little town (which also has a Sally Lunn's Tea Room and many wonderful little antique stores and old fashioned privately owned boutique stores."
  • Riamede Farm - Uses integrated pest management practices, apples, beans, beets, broad beans, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, eggplants, kale, snap peas (edible pod), hot peppers, sweet peppers, carving pumpkins, pie pumpkins, Swiss chard, winter squash, Heirloom tomatoes, tomatoes, watermelons, sunflowers, zinnias, flowers, Basil, Honey from hives on the farm, Local honey from within 50 miles, concessions or refreshment stand, bakery, picnic area, porta-potties, Cell service cell phones work here, No dogs allowed except for service animals, birthday parties, school tours
    122 Oakdale Road, Chester, NJ 07930. Phone: (908) 879-7762. Email: info@riamedefarm.com. Open: 1; All seven days from 9 am to 4:30 pm; 2; Typical season is from August 1 to December 23; 3; Out of season, we host events; Please see our website or Facebook page for currently planned events and tickets; 4; Availability of crops to pick varies considerably; please call or check our website for current availability. Click here for current open hours, days and dates. Directions: Click here for a map and directions. Apples typically are open August 20 to November 15 Vegetables are available August 1 to November 15. We use integrated pest management practices. Payment: Cash, Check, All credit cards, AndroidPay, ApplePay, EftPos, SNAP Vouchers. Pick apples in an old orchard with a 19th century ambiance featuring 34+ varieties of traditional, modern and heirloom apples. The pumpkin patch outback offers cut-off-the-vine, bring your own cutting shears. Also, pyo Indian corn, tomatoes & gourds. Cider, donuts, jams, jellies, honey. Free hayrides on weekends. School trips. Roam our peaceful 68 acres of scenic orchards & woodlands; enjoy the fall colors. We also have a roadside market / farm stand with Apples some of the Our apple varieties are Cortland, Empire, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Jonathan, Macoun, McIntosh, Red Delicious, Stayman/Winesap; traditional, modern and heirloom apple varieties available. We also have Cider, jams, jellies, honey, hay rides. Roam our 50 acres of scenic old orchards & woodlands; enjoy the fall colors.
    Click here for our Facebook page.
    Click here for our Instagram page.
    Other flowers: snapdragons.
    (UPDATED: March 25, 2024)

Somerset County

  • Pariso Farm - beans, corn (sweet), cucumbers, eggplants, pumpkins, summer squash, tomatoes, farm animals
    404 Skillman Road, Skillman, NJ 8558. Phone: 609-466-0947. Email: parisofarm@gmail.com. Open: PYO will be availble during all open hours of The Farm, see their Facebook page for hours. Directions: From North: Route 206 south, turn right at light onto Route 601 south. Continue for a few miles and turn right into Skillman Road \(US Post Office on corner\). From the South: Route 206 north. Turn left at light onto Route 518. Continue for a few miles and turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. \(US Post Office on corner\). From the West: Route 518 east. Turn left at light onto Hollow Road. Go over road level track crossing, and carry on for a mile. Turn left onto Camp Meeting Avenue. We are the third drive on the left after passing Fairview Road. From the East: Route 518 west. Turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. \(US Post Office on corner\). Go over the railroad bridge \(single lane\) and we are the second drive on the right. Payment: Cash, only. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, only. . . From North: Route 206 south, turn right at light onto Route 601 south. Continue for a few miles and turn right into Skillman Road (US Post Office on corner). From the South: Route 206 north. Turn left at light onto Route 518. Continue for a few miles and turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. (US Post Office on corner). From the West: Route 518 east. Turn left at light onto Hollow Road. Go over road level track crossing, and carry on for a mile. Turn left onto Camp Meeting Avenue. We are the third drive on the left after passing Fairview Road. From the East: Route 518 west. Turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. (US Post Office on corner). Go over the railroad bridge (single lane) and we are the second drive on the right. We anticipate opening mid-June. However, please check the website or phone for an exact date. In 2019, they have Shelling peas, sugar snaps, green beans, blueberries and squash (green and golden zucchini, tomatoes, , plus some pickle cucumbers, bibb lettuce and radishes as well. (ADDED: March 21, 2015)
  • Sunhaven Farms - Strawberries, sweet peas, peppers; green beans, eggplants, tomatoes; plum tomatoes , broccoli, cauliflower, garden mums
    1018 Orchard Drive, Hillsborough, NJ . Phone: (908) 369-6504. Email: njberryfarm@gmail.com. Open: Pick-your-own strawberries in June, fresh produce and plum tomatoes all summer long. Directions: New Center Road to Orchard Drive. . Click here for a map and directions. 79415/tiSunhaven Farms.
    Comments from a visitor on June 17, 2007: "We went toon Friday, and picked strawberries. The strawberries were really good! She had flowers to buy and hothouse tomatoes."

 

Green Bean, Lima Bean, Shelled Beans Picking Tips, Recipes and Information

When are fresh beans available?

Beans are a warm weather crop, and won't grow much in cold soil. It takes them about 60 to 70 days from seed to harvest.

 In the U.S. beans typically peak in harvesting from June through October in the South, and in July to September in the North. But they can be ready as early as early June in many places, if the weather is good.

  

Before you leave to go to the farm:

  1. Always call before you go to the farm - it's hard to pick in a muddy field!
  2. Most growers furnish picking containers designed for beans, but they may charge you for them; be sure to call before you go to see if you need to bring containers.
  3. Bring something to drink and a few snacks; you'd be surprised how you can work up a thirst and appetite! And don't forget hats and sunscreen for the sun. Bugs usually aren't a problem, but some deet might be good to bring along if it has been rainy.

  

Tips on How to Pick Beans

Whether you pick beans from your garden or at a Pick-Your-Own farm, here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Tips on How to Pick Green Beans

  1. Most beans these days are "stringless". That refers to a string, tough filament of the bean that runs along the outside from one end to the other.  Some beans have two, one on each side; and some have one.
  2. I prefer to snap the bean off the plant just below where the stem attaches to the bean. If you do this, it will save time when you get home, because one end of the bean has already been trimmed.  But this only makes sense if you will be using, cooking, canning or freezing the beans that day. 
  3. If you won't be using the beans the same day, then break  off the bean from the plant along the thin stem that connects the bean to the plant.
  4. The beans snap off pretty easily. hence the name "snap beans".
  5. Pole beans are the easiest to pick, because, since they grow up poles or twine, you don't have to squat down or bend over!
  6. Beans are ready for harvest when the pods are plump and firm, but not yet bulging. .
  7. In your own garden, pick your beans regularly to encourage more growth and prevent the pods from becoming tough and stringy.
  8. To harvest, hold the stem of the plant with one hand and gently snap the pod with the other..

Look for string, snap or green beans that are :

  1. firm
  2. green (not yellowish - unless you're picking yellow beans!)
  3. smooth, not wrinkly on the surface - that's an old or dried out bean. Snap beans are best when the pods are firm and snap readily, but before the seeds within the pod develop. The tips should be pliable
  4. not lumpy - those lumps are the beans that are developed - that's an overripe green bean!  Of course, if you want mature beans (not including the pod) then that's a different story, but we're talking about green beans here).
  5. The beans in the photo at right are, from left:
    - old and yellowing,
    - overripe and lumpy; and
    - dried out and damaged.
  6. Avoid placing the picked beans in the sunlight any longer than necessary. It is better to put them in the shade of a tree or shed than in the car trunk or on the car seat. Cool them as soon as possible after picking. I prefer to bring a cooler with ice in it. Green Beans may be kept fresh in the refrigerator for 3 or 4 days

 

When you get home

  1. After harvesting, store your beans in the refrigerator or blanch and freeze them for longer storage.
  2. Put them in the vegetable crisper in the fridge, in a loose plastic bag.
  3. They will be good for about a week like that.

  

Bean recipes and home canning

Now, get ready to can or freeze the extra beans - It is VERY easy! Click on the links for easy instructions.

  1. How to can green beans, yellow beans, snap beans, broad beans, etc.
  2. How to make pickled beans
  3. How to freeze green beans (and other beans)
  4. How to Freeze Lima Beans, Broad beans, Butter Beans and/or Pinto Beans
  5. Canning fresh shelled beans
  6. Canned dried beans and peas (from kidney beans, peas, lima beans, broadbeans, chickpeas, pole beans, etc.)
  7. Canned Baked  Beans With Tomato or Molasses Sauce
  8. Canned Baked  Beans With Back, Pork or Ham and Tomato or Molasses Sauce -
  9. Pickled green beans
  10. Pickled Dill beans
  11. Mustard beans (pickled mustard beans)
  12. Pickled Three-Bean Salad

Varieties

There are many different types of beans, each with their own unique flavor, texture, and growing requirements. Some of the most popular varieties include:

  • Green Beans: Also known as snap beans or string beans, green beans are a classic garden staple. They can be eaten fresh or cooked and come in bush and pole varieties.
  • Lima Beans: Lima beans (called Broad Beans or Butter Beans in the UK) are a nutritious and protein-rich vegetable that can be eaten fresh or dried. They require a long growing season and prefer warm temperatures.
  • Pole Beans: Pole beans are a climbing variety of bean that require support to grow. They can reach up to 10 feet tall and have a longer growing season than bush beans.
  • Dried Beans: Dried beans are a versatile pantry staple that can be used in soups, stews, and other dishes. Popular varieties include black beans, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans
  • s, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans

Other Local Farm Products (Honey, Horses, Milk, Meat, Eggs, Etc.)
(NOT pick-your-own, unless they are also listed above)

Northeast New Jersey Bean U-Pick Orchards in !

Find a local pick your own farm here!

Bean U-Pick Orchards in Northeast New Jersey in 2024, by county

Below are the U-Pick orchards and farms for beans that we know of in this area. Not all areas of any state, nor even every state, have beans orchards that are open to the public. If you know of any others, please tell us using the add a farm form!

Remember to always check with the farm's own website or Facebook page before you go - or call or email them if they don't have a website or Facebook page. Conditions at the farms and crops can change literally overnight, so if you want to avoid a wasted trip out there - check with the farm directly before you go! If I cannot reach them, I DON'T GO!

PLEASE report closed farms, broken links and incorrect info using the "Report Corrections" form below.

Morris County

  • Alstede Farms - apples, apricots, beans, blackberries, blueberries, broccoli, carrots, corn (sweet), cucumbers, currants (red and black), eggplant, flowers, gooseberries, herbs or spices, melons, nectarines, onions, other berries, peas, peaches, peppers, pumpkins, raspberries (red), raspberries (Spring, red), raspberries (Autumn, red), raspberries (yellow), raspberries (Spring, yellow), raspberries (Autumn, yellow), raspberries (black), raspberries (Spring, black), raspberries (Autumn, black), summer squash, winter squash, strawberries, tomatoes, other vegetables,
    1 Alstede Farms Lane, Chester, NJ 7930. Phone: 908-879-7189. Email: info@alstedefarms.com. Open: PYO Hours: Spring & Summer: 9 am to 6 pm, Fall: 9 am to 5 pm check website to see when hours change Click here for current open hours, days and dates. Directions: . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Debit cards, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, AmEx, WIC Vouchers, SFMNP Vouchers.
    Alstede Farms Facebook page. . . PYO Hours: Spring & Summer: 9 am to 6 pm, Fall: 9 am to 5 pm (check website to see when hours change) Picking updates: Click here for picking updates. We are also a CSA, which stands for Community Supported Agriculture. The basic idea of CSA farming is a cooperative relationship between the farmer and his customers. Based on an annual commitment to one another, community members provide a pre-season payment to purchase a share of the harvest . The member then receives a weekly box of a wide variety of fresh vegetables and fruit through the growing season, harvested at the peak of ripeness and flavor. We strongly recommend purchasing tickets for all Pick Your Own (PYO) activities in advance, online, utilizing our website. We can not guarantee PYO entry for walk in guests. Any (PYO) entry ticket that is purchased at the PYO sheds will incur a $5.00 per ticket convenience fee.Click here to view our updated Pick Your Own policies.Click here to purchase advance tickets.(UPDATED: September 7, 2021, JBS) (UPDATED: April 23, 2018)
    Comments from a visitor on July 19, 2019: "Blueberries and raspberries are $6.99/lb, which is high, but Peaches are $2.79/lb is is a good price."
    Comments from a visitor on August 12, 2012: "No longer is the price $3.00 (and optional $2.00 hayride). It is $5.00 each to enter farm with $3.00 credit per person. I said I did not need hayride to bring me to the apples and peaches that i could walk myself, but price is still $5.00. Taking hayride to fruits/ veggies OR NOT it is still $5.00 (with the $3.00 credit). Pretty expensive though, spent close to $100.00 on apples and peaches.."
    Comments from a visitor on September 22, 2010: "In reply to the post from Sept 11th 2010. I agree that at first it was a little unsettling to have to pay up front for the privilege of picking my own stuff. They charge $3.00 per person for admission to the fields and an additional $2.00 per person if you want to take the hayride. The hayride is completely optional, as the orchards/berry fields are easily within walking distance of the main areas and they actually give you back the $3.00 per person as credit towards paying for whatever you picked, you just need to hand over your ticket stubs to the cashier. My $30.00 worth of apples (My 3 yr old son had to pick an apple from every tree, lol) was reduced to only $12.00 after the credit. All in all, my family and I have a great time here and we come back every year for apples and pumpkins. We highly recommend it!"
    Comments from a visitor on September 11, 2010: "We visited today to pick our own fruit, something I've done multiple times per year with my daughters since we moved here 9 years ago. Sadly we were greeted with the new policy of paying $5 per person just to go out to the fields to pick..then you pay for the lbs of fruit on top of that. Can you imagine paying $20 for some raspberries?? That's what it would have cost us if just me and my 8 year old went out to the field and filled a basket! OUCH We didn't pick fruit and we didn't stay. What you used to be a fun simple low cost place to take your children has become a money hungry pit and almost commercial like. I can understand when they want to charge for the kids to play on the blow up rentals they have or ride the ponies but WHY would you charge a customer $5 to go out to the field and pick the berries FOR YOU and then pay for them? I know there are plenty other farms that don't do that and that's a shame. Shame Shame Shame"
    Comments from a visitor on June 27, 2009: "We love this farm!"
    Comments from a visitor, May 30, 2008: "They are open all year and have a fabulous store (if you don't want to get out in the brambles and pick your own) They are kid friendly with hayrides, horse rides, festivals, corn maze. They take credit cards and have restrooms. They make their own homemade ice cream (oh boy is it good!). They have farm markets in local communities throughout central NJ. You can even cut your very own wildflowers to take home in a bouquet! :D They are a great farm in a great little town (which also has a Sally Lunn's Tea Room and many wonderful little antique stores and old fashioned privately owned boutique stores."
  • Riamede Farm - Uses integrated pest management practices, apples, beans, beets, broad beans, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, eggplant, kale, snap peas (edible pod), hot peppers, sweet peppers, carving pumpkins, pie pumpkins, Swiss chard, winter squash, Heirloom tomatoes, tomatoes, watermelons, sunflowers, zinnias, flowers, Basil, Honey from hives on the farm, Local honey from within 50 miles, concessions or refreshment stand, bakery, picnic area, porta-potties, Cell service cell phones work here, No dogs allowed except for service animals, birthday parties, school tours
    122 Oakdale Road, Chester, NJ 7930. Phone: (908) 879-7762. Email: info@riamedefarm.com. Open: 1; All seven days from 9 am to 4:30 pm; 2; Typical season is from August 1 to December 23; 3; Out of season, we host events; Please see our website or Facebook page for currently planned events and tickets; 4; Availability of crops to pick varies considerably; please call or check our website for current availability. Directions: . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, All credit cards, AndroidPay, ApplePay, EftPos, SNAP Vouchers.
    Riamede Farm Facebook page. . Apples typically are open August 20 to November 15 Vegetables are available August 1 to November 15. We use integrated pest management practices. Pick apples in an old orchard with a 19th century ambiance featuring 34+ varieties of traditional, modern and heirloom apples. The pumpkin patch outback offers cut-off-the-vine, bring your own cutting shears. Also, pyo Indian corn, tomatoes & gourds. Cider, donuts, jams, jellies, honey. Free hayrides on weekends. School trips. Roam our peaceful 68 acres of scenic orchards & woodlands; enjoy the fall colors. We also have a roadside market / farm stand with Apples some of the Our apple varieties are Cortland, Empire, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Jonathan, Macoun, McIntosh, Red Delicious, Stayman/Winesap; traditional, modern and heirloom apple varieties available. We also have Cider, jams, jellies, honey, hay rides. Roam our 50 acres of scenic old orchards & woodlands; enjoy the fall colors. Click here for our Instagram page. Other flowers: snapdragons. (UPDATED: March 25, 2024)

Somerset County

  • Pariso Farm - beans, corn (sweet), cucumbers, eggplant, pumpkins, summer squash, tomatoes, farm animals
    404 Skillman Road, Skillman, NJ 8558. Phone: 609-466-0947. Email: parisofarm@gmail.com. Open: PYO will be availble during all open hours of The Farm, see their Facebook page for hours. Directions: From North: Route 206 south, turn right at light onto Route 601 south. Continue for a few miles and turn right into Skillman Road \(US Post Office on corner\). From the South: Route 206 north. Turn left at light onto Route 518. Continue for a few miles and turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. \(US Post Office on corner\). From the West: Route 518 east. Turn left at light onto Hollow Road. Go over road level track crossing, and carry on for a mile. Turn left onto Camp Meeting Avenue. We are the third drive on the left after passing Fairview Road. From the East: Route 518 west. Turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. \(US Post Office on corner\). Go over the railroad bridge \(single lane\) and we are the second drive on the right. Payment: Cash, only. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, only. . . From North: Route 206 south, turn right at light onto Route 601 south. Continue for a few miles and turn right into Skillman Road (US Post Office on corner). From the South: Route 206 north. Turn left at light onto Route 518. Continue for a few miles and turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. (US Post Office on corner). From the West: Route 518 east. Turn left at light onto Hollow Road. Go over road level track crossing, and carry on for a mile. Turn left onto Camp Meeting Avenue. We are the third drive on the left after passing Fairview Road. From the East: Route 518 west. Turn right at light onto Route 601 north. Turn left onto Skillman Road. (US Post Office on corner). Go over the railroad bridge (single lane) and we are the second drive on the right. We anticipate opening mid-June. However, please check the website or phone for an exact date. In 2019, they have Shelling peas, sugar snaps, green beans, blueberries and squash (green and golden zucchini, tomatoes, , plus some pickle cucumbers, bibb lettuce and radishes as well. (ADDED: March 21, 2015)
  • Sunhaven Farms - Strawberries, sweet peas, peppers; green beans, eggplant, tomatoes; plum tomatoes , broccoli, cauliflower, garden mums
    1018 Orchard Drive, Hillsborough, NJ . Phone: (908) 369-6504. Email: njberryfarm@gmail.com. Open: Pick-your-own strawberries in June, fresh produce and plum tomatoes all summer long. Directions: New Center Road to Orchard Drive. . Click here for a map and directions. 79415/tiSunhaven Farms.
    Comments from a visitor on June 17, 2007: "We went to on Friday, and picked strawberries. The strawberries were really good! She had flowers to buy and hothouse tomatoes."

 

Green Bean, Lima Bean, Shelled Beans Picking Tips, Recipes and Information

When are fresh beans available?

Beans are a warm weather crop, and won't grow much in cold soil. It takes them about 60 to 70 days from seed to harvest.

 In the U.S. beans typically peak in harvesting from June through October in the South, and in July to September in the North. But they can be ready as early as early June in many places, if the weather is good.

  

Before you leave to go to the farm:

  1. Always call before you go to the farm - it's hard to pick in a muddy field!
  2. Most growers furnish picking containers designed for beans, but they may charge you for them; be sure to call before you go to see if you need to bring containers.
  3. Bring something to drink and a few snacks; you'd be surprised how you can work up a thirst and appetite! And don't forget hats and sunscreen for the sun. Bugs usually aren't a problem, but some deet might be good to bring along if it has been rainy.

  

Tips on How to Pick Beans

Whether you pick beans from your garden or at a Pick-Your-Own farm, here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Tips on How to Pick Green Beans

  1. Most beans these days are "stringless". That refers to a string, tough filament of the bean that runs along the outside from one end to the other.  Some beans have two, one on each side; and some have one.
  2. I prefer to snap the bean off the plant just below where the stem attaches to the bean. If you do this, it will save time when you get home, because one end of the bean has already been trimmed.  But this only makes sense if you will be using, cooking, canning or freezing the beans that day. 
  3. If you won't be using the beans the same day, then break  off the bean from the plant along the thin stem that connects the bean to the plant.
  4. The beans snap off pretty easily. hence the name "snap beans".
  5. Pole beans are the easiest to pick, because, since they grow up poles or twine, you don't have to squat down or bend over!
  6. Beans are ready for harvest when the pods are plump and firm, but not yet bulging. .
  7. In your own garden, pick your beans regularly to encourage more growth and prevent the pods from becoming tough and stringy.
  8. To harvest, hold the stem of the plant with one hand and gently snap the pod with the other..

Look for string, snap or green beans that are :

  1. firm
  2. green (not yellowish - unless you're picking yellow beans!)
  3. smooth, not wrinkly on the surface - that's an old or dried out bean. Snap beans are best when the pods are firm and snap readily, but before the seeds within the pod develop. The tips should be pliable
  4. not lumpy - those lumps are the beans that are developed - that's an overripe green bean!  Of course, if you want mature beans (not including the pod) then that's a different story, but we're talking about green beans here).
  5. The beans in the photo at right are, from left:
    - old and yellowing,
    - overripe and lumpy; and
    - dried out and damaged.
  6. Avoid placing the picked beans in the sunlight any longer than necessary. It is better to put them in the shade of a tree or shed than in the car trunk or on the car seat. Cool them as soon as possible after picking. I prefer to bring a cooler with ice in it. Green Beans may be kept fresh in the refrigerator for 3 or 4 days

 

When you get home

  1. After harvesting, store your beans in the refrigerator or blanch and freeze them for longer storage.
  2. Put them in the vegetable crisper in the fridge, in a loose plastic bag.
  3. They will be good for about a week like that.

  

Bean recipes and home canning

Now, get ready to can or freeze the extra beans - It is VERY easy! Click on the links for easy instructions.

  1. How to can green beans, yellow beans, snap beans, broad beans, etc.
  2. How to make pickled beans
  3. How to freeze green beans (and other beans)
  4. How to Freeze Lima Beans, Broad beans, Butter Beans and/or Pinto Beans
  5. Canning fresh shelled beans
  6. Canned dried beans and peas (from kidney beans, peas, lima beans, broadbeans, chickpeas, pole beans, etc.)
  7. Canned Baked  Beans With Tomato or Molasses Sauce
  8. Canned Baked  Beans With Back, Pork or Ham and Tomato or Molasses Sauce -
  9. Pickled green beans
  10. Pickled Dill beans
  11. Mustard beans (pickled mustard beans)
  12. Pickled Three-Bean Salad

Varieties

There are many different types of beans, each with their own unique flavor, texture, and growing requirements. Some of the most popular varieties include:

  • Green Beans: Also known as snap beans or string beans, green beans are a classic garden staple. They can be eaten fresh or cooked and come in bush and pole varieties.
  • Lima Beans: Lima beans (called Broad Beans or Butter Beans in the UK) are a nutritious and protein-rich vegetable that can be eaten fresh or dried. They require a long growing season and prefer warm temperatures.
  • Pole Beans: Pole beans are a climbing variety of bean that require support to grow. They can reach up to 10 feet tall and have a longer growing season than bush beans.
  • Dried Beans: Dried beans are a versatile pantry staple that can be used in soups, stews, and other dishes. Popular varieties include black beans, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans
  • s, navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo (aka, chick peas) and pinto beans

Other Local Farm Products (Honey, Horses, Milk, Meat, Eggs, Etc.)
(NOT pick-your-own, unless they are also listed above)