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Apple U-Pick Orchards in Southeastern Virginia, Virginia Beach in 2022, by county

Below are the U-Pick orchards and farms for apples that we know of in this area. Not all areas of any state, nor even every state, have apples orchards that are open to the public. If you know of any others, please tell us using the add a farm form!

Virginia Beach (City of)

  • Cullipher Farm Market - Uses integrated pest management practices, strawberries, apples, pumpkins, flowers, Honey from hives on the farm
    1444 Princess Anne Road, Virginia Beach, VA 23456. Phone: (757) 721-7456. Email: [email protected]. Open: Late April to early September, various hours. Directions: . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Debit cards, Visa, MasterCard.
    Cullipher Farm Market Facebook page. . Crops are usually available in April, May, June. We use natural practices, but are not seeking organic certification. Farm is located atop the fertile Pungo Ridge in southern Virginia Beach. The farm is family owned and operated by fourth and fifth generation Culliphers. We are proud to grow over 250 varieties of the highest quality fruits and vegetables specializing in strawberries, sweet corn and tomatoes. You can enjoy our produce by visiting our roadside stand,picking in our fields,going to satellite farmers' markets, or by signing up for one of our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Programs. Cullipher Farm is located atop the fertile Pungo Ridge in southern Virginia Beach. The farm is family owned and operated by fourth and fifth generation Culliphers. We are proud to grow over 250 varieties of the highest quality fruits and vegetables specializing in strawberries, sweet corn and tomatoes. You can enjoy our produce by visiting our roadside stand, satellite farmers' markets, or by signing up for one of our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Programs. Our Fall U-Pick seasons is highlighted by our pumpkins and apples.In 2015 we planted our first high density apples. These apples are planted and grow on a trellis system and top out at around 10 feet. They will be ready to pick in 2017! In addition to our 8 varieties of apples we plant over 30 different types of pumpkins ranging from small to large, bumpy or flat, with a variety of colors. Click here for a link to our Facebook page The Cullipher family uses Integrated Pest Management (IPM) which emphasizes sustainable and ecological growing practices. IPM means the use of multiple methods, including biological, cultural, genetic and chemicals to control pests. Crop rotation is a key component in our pest management. We do not use any genetically modified organisms (GMO's) on our farm
    Comments from a visitor on June 26, 2011: "Great people, only organic strawberry patch in Va. Great berries, they are open early for organic strawberries, so get on their email list. Lots of other things also."

Chesapeake (City of)

  • Greenbrier Farms - Uses natural growing practices, apples, asparagus, blackberries, blueberries, broccoli, carrots, corn (sweet), cucumbers, eggplant, flowers, nectarines, peaches, peppers, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, strawberries, tomatoes, other vegetables, Honey from hives on the farm, Fresh eggs, concessions \\/ refreshment stand, restrooms, picnic area, face painting, inflatables or bounce houses, farm animals, birthday parties, weddings and wedding parties, school tours, group reservations
    225 Sign Pine Rd, Chesapeake, VA 23322. Phone: (757) 421-2141. Email: [email protected]nfo. Open: Times change seasonally Call for Details. Directions: Take exit 8A from VA-168 South. Take Hillcrest Parkway to Edinburg Parkway. Turn left on Street Brides Road, then turn left on Sign Pine Road. Greenbrier Farms is at the end of Sign Pine Road. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Debit cards, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, AmEx.
    Greenbrier Farms Facebook page. . Alternate Phone: (757) 421-4550. . We use natural practices, but are not seeking organic certification. is a working farm with more than 300 acres of plants, trees, fruits and vegetables. Our popuar pick-your-own strawberry field is a favorite for families throughout the Hampton Roads and Northeast North Carolina area. We have great fields, with plenty of berries to pick from! While you're here, the kids can play on the playground, visit our animal petting area, see ducks, chickens and Millie the pig, see antique tractors and generally enjoy running around the farm. (UPDATED: March 25, 2019)

James City County

  • Bush Neck Farm - Pick-your-own apples, blueberries, sweet corn, peaches, pumpkins.
    1502 Bush Neck Road, Williamsburg, VA 23188. Phone: (757) 258-0114. Email: [email protected]. Open: Mid April to mid November; from 8 am to 4 pm, Monday to Saturday. Click here for a map and directions. Bush Neck Farm . About 7 miles west of Williamsburg. At Lightfoot, next to the Outlet Mall, turn down Centerville Road, which is Route 614. Go 4.3 miles to Route 633, Jolly Pond Road. This road becomes Bush Neck Road, which dead-ends at the farm.U - Pick: Apples, Blueberries, Peaches, Pumpkins in season end of June through Mid-November. School Field Trips September through Mid-November Also, School tours May 1-November 10. Picnic area. A visitor writes on July 29, 2013: "July 2013 - Went twice during blueberry season and was amazed at how many blueberries there were. It was a long drive, but beautiful and well worth it! Abundant blueberries for $2/lb. No crowds to deal with and had no encounters with wasps, etc. Already planning to go again next year! (James City, VA)"A visitor writes on July 03, 2013: "Me and my two young kids had a great experience today at bush neck! David was very nice and the fruit was beautiful. We picked and smacked on blueberries and peaches and enjoyed the singing birds and georgeous property! It was a long drive out there but well worth the trip! We will definitely be back :-)"
    Comments from a visitor on May 05, 2011: (positive) "My 11yr old daughter and I went to Bush Neck Farms in Williamsburg last year. We had a great time and was pleasantly surprised to find the owner was her retired elementary school principal. The owners were very nice and accommodating. The peaches were in abundance and sweet. I believe they have only white peaches. The peaches & blueberries were easy to pick in well maintained groves. The blueberries were at the end of their season, but we still found plenty to pick. Will definitely go back again."
    Comments from a visitor on May 01, 2011: (positive) "We have been going to Bush Neck Farms several times a summer for 8 years. The owners are wonderful- they have watched our children grow up and care about our family. They love what they do and how they do it. The location is stunningly beautiful and the peaches and blueberries are amazing. By far our favorite picking location! "
    Comments from a visitor on July 13, 2010: (positive) "I visit Bush Neck Farm with my family every year. We always enjoy the blueberries, apples, and peaches. The prices are reasonable, not outrageous, and the owners- while they don't always seem bubbly or excited to see you- are good people. The gentleman that owns the farm and spends most of the summer out in the heat has always been patient and pleasant when I have been there. I hope that future visitors are not so quick to judge. "
    Comments from a visitor on July 11, 2010: "The farm is a half-hour drive from Rte.60. I note that one former visitor used the term "crumudgeonly" (sic)to describe the owners of this farm. I think the actual term should be "curmudgeonly." I would use the simple term "grouches." Be forewarned: They only accept cash AND only checks from James City County, Williamsburg, Poquoson and Yorktown!? They were skeptical about allowing use of our own picking containers as well. Needless to say, we moved on without their berries. There are friendlier farms in the surrounding counties."
    Comments from a visitor on July 01, 2010: (positive) "Went blueberry picking on June 30th. Delicious and plentiful! Also picked yellow transparent apples for applesauce. "

Apple picking tips:

Apples ripen from the outside of the tree towards the center, so the apples out the outside of the tree will ripen first.  Once they are picked, they stop ripening. Picking apples directly from a tree is easy. Roll the apple upwards off the branch and give a little twist; don't pull straight away from the tree. If two apples are joined together at the top, both will come away at the same time. Don't shake the trees or branches.  If the apple you are trying to pick drops, (or others on the tree) go ahead and pick it up. They're perfectly fine! But do wash them before you eat them! More info: How to tell when apples are ripe

  • Once picked, don't throw the apples into the baskets, place them in gently, or they will bruise and go bad more quickly.
  • Don't wash apples until just before using to prevent spoilage.
  • For an explanation of why apple slices turn brown and how to stop it, see this page!
  • Keep apples cool after picking to increase shelf life.  A cool basement is ideal, but the fruit/vegetable drawer of a refrigerator will work, too.  A refrigerator is fine for small quantities of apples. Boxed apples need to be kept in a cool, dark spot where they won't freeze. Freezing ruptures all of an apple's cells, turning it into one large bruise overnight. The usual solution is to store apples in a root cellar. But root cellars often have potatoes in them: apples and potatoes should never be stored in the same room because, as they age, potatoes release an otherwise ethylene gas, which makes apples spoil faster. If you can keep the gas away from your apples, they will keep just fine. Just don't store them right next to potatoes.
    Prevent contact between apples stored for the winter by wrapping them individually in sheets of newspaper. The easiest way to do this is to unfold a section of newspaper all the way and tear it into quarters. Then stack the wrapped apples . See more here: How to store apples at home
  • Apples don't improve or "ripen" after being picked - this is an urban myth - see this page for the truth - with references!

Which apple variety is best?

There are tens of thousands of varieties of apples, developed over centuries. They vary in sugar, acoidity, flavors, storing, crispness and many other attributes. See our guides to apple varieties:

Canning apples - fully illustrated, with step-by-step instructions

Recipes, illustrated with step by step instructions

Using fresh apples and miscellaneous

 

Other Local Farm Products (Honey, Horses, Milk, Meat, Eggs, Etc.)
(NOT pick-your-own, unless they are also listed above)


Above is the
2020 version of
the Ball Blue Book