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Can I sell homemade BBQ sauce, Salsa, Pickles, Tomato Sauce, Hot sauce, Apple Butter, and similar acidified foods in Georgia ... without a license?

Foods prepared at home or in any kitchen that is not inspected and licensed must comply with the requirements and limitations of Georgia's Cottage Food laws. That only allows a few specific fods to be made from home.

Specificaly prohibited are "Cooked, plant-based foods (e.g., cooked rice, beans, or vegetables)."

 BBQ sauce, salsa, pickles, hot sauce, fruit butters, tomato sauce, spaghetti sauce, etc. are acidified foods which are prohibited. In the Georgia state FAQs, they say:

Food products made with cooked vegetable products do not qualify under the Cottage Food Regulations. Manufacturers of cooked vegetable products like salsas and tomato sauces must meet significant federal and state training and licensing requirements. Cooked vegetables, whether fresh or canned, usually are made from a combination of low acid and acidified foods, and are considered a Potentially Hazardous Food. Cooked vegetables must be held either hot (above 135°F) or cold
(below 41°F). They can't be stored at room temperature, which makes them ineligible for production in a cottage food operation.

Additionally, I found this in their FAQS:

 

Can I produce and sell cooked vegetable products, like salsas, tomato sauces, spaghetti sauces, or foccacia bread with roasted vegetables? No. Food products made with cooked vegetable products do not qualify under the Cottage Food Regulations. Manufacturers of cooked vegetable products like salsas and tomato sauces must meet significant federal and state training and licensing requirements. Cooked vegetables, whether fresh or canned, usually are made from a combination of low acid and acidified foods, and are considered a Potentially Hazardous Food. Cooked vegetables must be held either hot (above 135°F) or cold (below 41°F). They can't be stored at room temperature, which makes them ineligible for production in a cottage food operation.

And:

 
Fruit butters have significantly less sugar than a traditional jam or jelly. It is the combination of acid, sugar, pectin and heat that assures the safety of jams and jellies. In fruit butters, the combination of sugar and pectin is not large enough to assure that the butter is safe. Additionally, with lower sugar and pectin levels, spoilage organisms are more likely to survive the cooking process, which would allow for a micro-environment to develop and allow for the growth of Clostridium botulinum.
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The Presto Pressure
canners are out
of stock, but Tfal's
are available!


Above is the
2020 version of
the Ball Blue Book