Find a local pick your own farm here!

Onion U-Pick farms in Triangle area of North Carolina in 2024, by county

Below are the U-Pick farms for onions that we know of in this area. Not all areas of any state, nor even every state, have onions orchards that are open to the public. If you know of any others, please tell us using the add a farm form!

Remember to always check with the farm's own website or Facebook page before you go - or call or email them if they don't have a website or Facebook page. Conditions at the farms and crops can change literally overnight, so if you want to avoid a wasted trip out there - check with the farm directly before you go! If I cannot reach them, I DON'T GO!

PLEASE report closed farms, broken links and incorrect info using the "Report Corrections" form below.

Franklin County

  • DeMilia Research Farm - Uses integrated pest management practices, asparagus, beans, beets, broad beans, broccoli, carrots, corn (sweet), cotton, cucumbers, eggplants, herbs or spices, melons, onions, peas, peppers, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, strawberries, tomatoes, other vegetables,
    295 Pine Ridge Rd, Zebulon, NC 27597. Phone: (919) 522-1567. Email: info@demiliaresearchfarm.com. Open: hours, days and dates. Directions: Located just south of Bunn, NC on Rte 39 at the intersection of Johnson Town Road and Pine Ridge Road Follow the \runway\" lights down the long rock driveway. 295 Pine Ridge Rd". Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Debit cards, Visa, MasterCard.
    DeMilia Research Farm Facebook page. Zebulon

Granville County

  • Lyon Farms - Beans, Blackberry, Blueberries, Cantaloupe, Corn, Greens, Onions, Potatoes, pumpkins, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelon, Vegetables
    1544 Munns Rd, Creedmoor, NC 27522. Phone: 919-528-3263. Email: lyonfarmsveggies@gmail.com. Open: April 13th - May 29th Mon-Fri 8am to 8pm, Sat, 8 am to 6 pm, Sun 1pm to 6pmSummer hours are May 30th - August 13th Mon-Sat 9 am to 6 pm, Closed Sunday. Directions: From Durham take I-85 north take Exit 186-A go 2 miles. From Raleigh take Hwy 50 north, follow signs. From Oxford take I-85 south, go left to Hwy 15 turn right, follow signs. U-pick pumpkins, corn maze and hay rides October 1-31 Saturday-Sunday 10-6. Monday-Friday for field trips by appointment. . Click here for a map and directions.
    Lyon Farms Facebook page. . Open click here for a map to the farm. Typical harvest dates: Strawberries & Sweet Onions - April-June Cabbage, Beets & Greens - April-May New Potatoes - May-June Beans, Blackberries, Blueberries, Corn, Cantaloupe, Tomatoes & Okra - June-July Watermelon - July-August Fig - August-September. Facebook page.

Johnston County

  • Flintstone Farm - beans, broad beans, broccoli, carrots, corn (sweet), cucumbers, eggplants, flowers, grapes, herbs or spices, melons, onions, peas, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, other vegetables, petting zoo, farm animals, birthday parties, school tours
    460-C Watston Road, Selma, NC 27576. Phone: 919-284-1100. Email: flintstone_farm@yahoo.com. Open: every day; Just call. Directions: We are located Behind North Johnston High School in Micro, NC Just a mile or two from Hiway 301 Between Micro and Kenly . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, only. . Crops are usually available in March through November. We strive to be available every Friday.

Nash County

  • Wrenn's Farm - Strawberries, Beans, Cantaloupe, Corn, Cucumber, Greenhouse Tomatoes, Greenhouse Vegetables, Asparagus, Cabbage, Onions, Squash, Tomatoes, Watermelon
    5078 Brantley Road, Zebulon, NC 27597. Phone: (919) 269-9781. Email: wrennsfarm@gmail.com. Open: Sunday noon-6 pm, Monday to Saturday 8 am to 8 pm; April 15 thru August 15. Directions: Located 4 miles east of Zebulon between Old Hwy 264 & Hwy 97 on Brantley Road. Crop availability: Strawberries & Asparagus - April-May Tomatoes & Cucumbers - April-June Onions & Cabbage - May-June Squash - June Corn - July Cantaloupes, Butterbean \(picked & shelled\) & Watermelon - July-August. . Click here for a map and directions.
    Wrenn's Farm Facebook page. . Phone: (919) 306-2735. . Located 4 miles east of Zebulon between Old Hwy 264 & Hwy 97 on Brantley Road. Crop availability: Strawberries & Asparagus - April-May Tomatoes & Cucumbers - April-June Onions & Cabbage - May-June Squash - June Corn - July Cantaloupes, Butterbean (picked & shelled) & Watermelon - July-August. Facebook page.

Person County

  • Carver Farm Nursery - strawberries, beans, beets, blackberries, corn (sweet), cucumbers, flowers, melons, onions, peas, peppers, pumpkins, tomatoes,
    105 Carver Farm Rd, Roxboro, NC 27573. Phone: 336 599 4901. Email: carverfarmnursery@charter.net. Open: Monday to Friday from 7 am to 5 pm and Saturday from 7 am to 12 pm; closed on Sunday. Directions: Highway 501 North outside of Roxboro, NC towards South Boston, VA. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Debit cards, Visa, MasterCard. Carver Farm Nursery .

Wake County

  • Neighbor Boy Farm and Country Store - Uses natural growing practices, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries (Spring, red), raspberries (Autumn, red), beans, you-dig carrots, cucumbers, lettuce or salad greens, onions, hot peppers, sweet peppers, summer squash, Heirloom tomatoes, paste or Roma tomatoes, tomatoes, other vegetables, Other vegetables, sunflowers, flowers, Basil, Mint, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Honey from hives on the farm, Fresh eggs, U-pick and already picked, gift shop, concessions or refreshment stand, restrooms, picnic area you may bring your own food
    1008 Davis Drive, Apex, NC 27523. Phone: (919) 637-9894. Email: val@neighborboyinc.com. Open: Check Facebook and our website for our hours, which vary seasonally. Directions: . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, Check, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, AmEx.
    Neighbor Boy Farm and Country Store Facebook page. . Picking updates: Click here for picking updates. Our pick-your-own season starts mid-June;. We use natural practices, but are not seeking organic certification. Additional pick your own: large variety of seasonal flowers and wildflowers, spinach. Pumpkins and Christmas Trees available during the season. (UPDATED: April 30, 2022) (ADDED: July 12, 2021)
  • Phillips Strawberries - Cabbage, Cucumber, Onions, Strawberries, Tours, Squash,
    6701 Good Hope Church Road, Morrisville, NC 27560. Phone: (919) 467-3004. Open: UPDATE FOR 2021: Please Note: We are not doing u-pick berries in 2021 You can purchase our delicious strawberries at our Farmers Market shelter during the week starting at 10am until we run out and during our Farmers Market 9 am to 3 pm on weekends; Sunday to Saturday 8 am to 7 pm. Directions: Located on Good Hope Church Road across from the church. Click here for a map and directions. . UPDATE FOR 2021: Please Note: We are not doing u-pick berries in 2021 You can purchase our delicious strawberries at our Farmers Market shelter during the week (starting at 10am until we run out) and during our Farmers Market (9 am to 3 pm) on weekends; Sunday to Saturday 8 am to 7 pm. . Good Hope Church Road is off of Carpenter Morrisville Road between Hwy 54/Hwy 55 in Morrisville. Crop availability: Strawberries - April 15-June 1 Cabbage, Onions, Squash & Cucumber - Seasonal. Various rides and activities on Strawberry Day, School Groups are welcome. Call for more information.
  • The Collard Patch - beans, broad beans, broccoli, corn (sweet), onions, summer squash, strawberries, other vegetables, and prepicked produce
    7012 Pulley Town Road, Wake Forest, NC 27587. Phone: 919-556-5135. Email: thecollardpatch@nc.rr.com. Open: Monday to Saturday 7am to 6pm for vegetables; Sunday Strawberries only 8am to 5pm. Directions: From Raleigh go 401 North to Rolesville. Continue 1 mile through Rolesville turn right on Pulley Town Road. Go 34 of a mile to Second brick home on left. See sign on the left The Collard Patch. . Click here for a map and directions. Payment: Cash, only.
    The Collard Patch Facebook page. . From Raleigh go 401 North to Rolesville. Continue 1 mile through Rolesville turn right on Pulley Town Road. Go 3/4 of a mile to Second brick home on left. See sign on the left . Fall Cabbage, Collards and Sweet Potatoes will be ready in late October. Facebook page. is a pick-your-own roadside farm market. It is designed to help you obtain the freshest locally grown vegetables in this area. A lot of pride has gone in to growing the finest, tastiest garden vegetables, maintaining all the nutritional benefits.

 

Onion

Onion Picking Tips, Recipes and Information

Vidalia onions

Here's what you need to know about onions, how to choose them, how to harvest them and how to use them!

Know when to harvest onions:

  • Bulb Size and Shape: Onions are typically ready for harvest when the bulbs have reached a decent size and have a firm, solid feel. They should be well-rounded and have a healthy appearance.
  • Tops and Foliage: The foliage or green tops of the onion plant will start to yellow and wilt as the bulbs mature. Once about half of the tops have fallen over or turned brown, it's a good indication that the onions are ready for harvest.
  • Skin and Neck: The outer skin of the onion should be dry and papery. Gently press the neck area between your fingers to check if it feels soft or if it's firm and well-dried. A dry neck indicates that the onion is mature and suitable for harvesting.

How to harvest onions

  • When to harvest: Onions are typically ready for harvest in late spring in the deep South; or in the North in summer or early fall, depending on the growing season and the onion variety you have planted. Refer to the recommended maturity time for the specific onion variety you are growing.
  • Loosening the Soil: Before harvesting, gently loosen the soil around the onions using a garden fork (tine) or trowel. Be careful not to damage the bulbs during this process.
  • Lifting the Onions: Grab the onion bulbs by their foliage or tops, near the base, and gently lift them from the soil. If the bulbs are difficult to lift, use a garden fork to carefully loosen the soil further.
  •  Curing: After harvesting, allow the onions to dry or cure for a few days in a well-ventilated area. This process helps the outer layers of the onion to dry and form a protective layer. Spread the onions out in a single layer or hang them in bunches to cure.

Storing onions

  • Preparing for Storage: Once the onions have cured, remove any excess dirt or loose outer layers of skin. Cut off the foliage, leaving about an inch of the neck attached to the bulb.
  •  Storage Conditions: Onions should be stored in a cool, dry, and well-ventilated place. A dark pantry, basement, or a mesh bag in the refrigerator are suitable storage options. Avoid storing onions near potatoes, as they can release gases that promote spoilage.
  • Proper Containers: For long-term storage, consider using mesh bags, breathable containers, or wooden crates to allow air circulation. Avoid storing onions in plastic bags, as they can trap moisture and lead to spoilage.
  • Check Regularly: Periodically check stored onions for any signs of spoilage or sprouting. Remove any onions that show signs of rot or decay to prevent it from affecting other onions in storage.

Onion recipes

There are few home canning recipes exclusive to onions, since they store well in a cool garage or basement, and being a low / non acidic food, they must be acidified (pickled).

 

Varieties and Types of Onion

The most common types of onions and their uses are:

 

  1.  Yellow Onions: Yellow onions are the most widely available and commonly used variety. They have a strong, pungent flavor and a slightly sweet undertone. These onions have a papery golden-brown skin and white flesh. Yellow onions are versatile and work well in various cooked dishes, such as soups, stews, caramelized onions, and sautés. They can also be used raw in salads and salsas if you prefer a bolder flavor. 
     
  2.  Red Onions: Red onions are known for their vibrant purplish-red skin and mild to moderate pungency. They have a slightly milder and sweeter flavor compared to yellow onions. Red onions are commonly used raw in salads, sandwiches, and wraps as they add a pop of color and a crisp texture. They can also be pickled, grilled, or roasted to bring out their sweetness.
     
  3. White Onions: White onions have a pale white skin and a sharp, tangy flavor. They are milder than yellow onions and have a slightly sweeter taste. White onions are commonly used in Mexican and Latin American cuisines. They work well in raw preparations like salsas, guacamole, and salads. They can also be used in cooked dishes, especially in sauces, soups, and stir-fries that require a milder onion flavor.
     
  4. Sweet Onions: Sweet onions, such as Vidalia, Walla Walla, and Maui onions, have a high sugar content, resulting in a mild and sweet flavor. They have a light yellow or pale golden skin. Sweet onions are delicious when used raw in salads, sandwiches, and relishes, where their sweetness can shine. They can also be grilled, caramelized, or used in cooked dishes that require a mellow onion flavor.
    Vidalia Onions are a type of yellow onion, unusually sweet, grown in Vidalia County, Georgia
    Peru Sweet Onions  - somewhat similar to Vidalia's but grown in Peru.
    Walla Wall Onions  - somewhat similar to Vidalia's but grown in Washington State.
     
  5. Shallots: Shallots are small, elongated onions with a reddish-brown or grayish-brown skin. They have a mild, delicate flavor with a hint of garlic-like sharpness. Shallots are versatile and can be used in various culinary applications. They are often used in dressings, vinaigrettes, and sauces. Shallots can also be sautéed, roasted, or incorporated into stir-fries and risottos.
     
  6. Spring Onions (Scallions): Spring onions, also known as scallions or green onions, have long green stalks and small white bulbs. They have a mild, onion-like flavor and are often used for their fresh and crisp texture. Spring onions are commonly used as a garnish in salads, soups, and Asian dishes. They can be thinly sliced and sprinkled on top of various dishes or used as a flavoring agent in stir-fries and noodle dishes.


 

 

Other Local Farm Products (Honey, Horses, Milk, Meat, Eggs, Etc.)
(NOT pick-your-own, unless they are also listed above)