How to Easily Make Pineapple Jam! EASY, illustrated step-by-step instructions!

This month's notes: July 2014: Blueberries, blackberries, raspberries tomatoes, corn and most vegetables are being picked in most places; strawberries are finishing or done; Peaches are in and early apples will start in late July. Find a local blueberry festival and blueberry picking tips here. See how easy it is to make strawberry jam or strawberry-rhubarb jam! Make your own homemade strawberry ice cream including low fat, low sugar and other flavors))  Have fun, eat healthier and better tasting, and save money by picking your own locally grown fruit and vegetables, and then using our easy canning and freezing directions!

Organic farms are identified in green!  See our guide to local fruit and vegetable festivals!. Please tell the farms you found them here - and ask them to update their information!!

Bookmark and Share Subscribe to our: Email alerts Follow us on Twitter  Add this page to your favorites! - Email this page to a friend, or to yourself


How to Make Homemade Canned Pineapple - Easily!canning pineapple at home

Click here for a PDF print version

Making and canning your own pineapple is also quite easy. Here's how to do it, in easy steps and completely illustrated. If your looking for a jam recipe and directions, click here! We also have directions to make applesauce, apple butter, pickles and others!

Ingredients

  • Pineapple - An average of 21 pounds of fresh pineapple (just the body, without the tops) is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 13 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints – an average of 3 pounds per quart.
  • Lemon Juice - 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Sugar - Sugar (or fruit juice, or Stevia (or if you prefer, Splenda), or just water!)

Equipment

  • Jar funnel ($2 at Target, other big box stores, and often grocery stores; and available online - see this page) or order it as part of the kit with the jar grabber.
  • At least 1 large pot; I prefer 16 to 20 quart Teflon lined pots for easy cleanup.
  • Large spoons and ladles
  • 1 Canner (a huge pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 at mall kitchen stores, sometimes at big box stores and grocery stores.).  Note: we sell canners and supplies here, too - at excellent prices - and it helps support this web site!
  • Ball jars (Grocery stores, like Publix, Kroger, Safeway carry them, as do some big box stores - about $8 per dozen quart jars including the lids and rings)
  • Lids - thin, flat, round metal lids with a gum binder that seals them against the top of the jar.  They may only be used once.
  • Rings - metal bands that secure the lids to the jars.  They may be reused many times.
  • Jar grabber (to pick up the hot jars) - Big box stores and grocery stores sometimes carry them; and it is available online - see this page. It's a tremendously useful to put jars in the canner and take the hot jars out (without scalding yourself!).  The kit sold below has everything you need, and at a pretty good price:

    Optional stuff:

    • Lid lifter (has a magnet to pick the lids out of the boiling water where you sanitize them. ($2 at big box stores or it comes in the kit at left)

Canning Pineapple Directions

This example shows you how to make home-canned pineapple, using methods tested by the USDA and Ball.  The yield from this recipe is about 4 or 5 eight-ounce jars.

 

Step 1 - Prepare the pineapple the Ingredients

Wash the pineapple in cold water. Core and remove eyes and tough fiber. Slice or cube (3/4 inch or 3 cm cubes).

 

Step 2 - Get the jars and lids washed

The dishwasher is fine for the jars; especially if it has a "sanitize" cycle; you don't really have to sanitize the jars - the boiling water bath sanitizes everything, jar, lid, contents and all; but you DO want to get the jars as clean as you can first.  I get the dishwasher going while I'm preparing everything else, so the jars are clean and hot (and less likely to crack when you put boiling hot fruit in them)  by the time I'm ready to fill the jars.

Lids:  Put the lids into a pan of hot water for at least several minutes; to soften up the gummed surface and clean the lids.


Need lids, rings and replacement jars? 

Get them all here, delivered direct to your home,  at the best prices on the internet!

 

 

Step 3 - Make your syrup

Pineapple may be packed in water, apple juice, white grape juice, or in very light, light, or medium syrup.  It's up to you which to use.  Sugar is added to improve flavor, help stabilize color, and retain the shape of the fruit. It is not added as a preservative. Sugar solution is much less expensive (unless you have a supply of cheap grape juice), so I usually use a light solution to keep sugar (and the added calories) to a minimum.

Sugar Syrup
 
Syrup Sugar Water Yield
Light 2 cups 6 cups 7 cups
Medium 3 cups 6 cups 6 1/2 cups
Heavy 4 cups 6 cups 7 cups
NOTE: you can ALSO use fruit juice (if you want a natural alternative) or water or artificial sweetener (Stevia (or if you prefer, Splenda), but NOT Nutrasweet; if you want a low calorie alternative).  Click here for instruction about how to prepare these sugarless, fruit juice, or Stevia (or if you prefer, Splenda) solutions!

To prepare syrup, while heating water, add sugar slowly, stirring constantly to dissolve. Bring to a gentle boil and keep it simmering. After preparing the liquid syrup, keep it hot (but not boiling).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4 - Hot Packing your pineapple

Hot packing is recommended for all fruits because it is a bit safer and makes fruit easier to pack in jars. Hot packed pineapples are also less likely to float than pineapples canned by the raw-pack method. Hot packing also helps top reduce air entrapment (bubbles) as the cell structure of pineapples tends to retain air; which is released during the heating prior to the jars being filled.  Hot packing also tends to produce brighter colors.

Just put the cut pineapple into the barely boiling syrup solution for 10 minutes. ]


(If you still want to use the "cold pack" or "raw pack" method, just skip this step!)

 

Step 5 - Fill the jars

Pack the pineapples into sanitized jars (leaving 1/2 to 1 inch space at the top) and cover with boiling sugar syrup leaving 1/2 inch head space. (if you don't cook or heat the pineapples first, this is called "cold packing"). Run a rubber spatula or table knife gently between pineapples and jar to release trapped air bubbles. To do this more effectively, tilt the jar slightly while running the tool between the fruit and the edge of the jar and also pressing inward against the fruit a few times.

After packing the pineapples in the jar, pour the syrup solution up to 1/2 inch (1 cm) from the top.  the fruit should be covered completely. If you have problems with fruit darkening (turning brown) later, then sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon of FruitFresh or ascorbic acid into the top of the jar before you seal it.

Wipe rim and screw threads with a clean damp cloth. Add lid, screw band and tighten firmly and evenly. Do not over tighten.

Tips!

Canned fruits often will float if the sugar syrup is too heavy, if jars are packed too loosely or if air remains in the tissues of the fruit after processing. To avoid this use a light or medium sugar syrup, make sure fruit is firm and ripe and pack fruit tightly in jars without crushing.

If fruit is not covered by liquid it may darken during storage (but does not necessarily mean it is spoiled, as all fruits will darken somewhat). To avoid this be sure fruit is covered by removing air bubbles from jars liquid while still leaving the recommended head space. Also be sure to remove trapped air bubbles as described earlier.

Pineapples, peaches, pears and apples may also show a blue, red or pink color change after canning. This is the result of natural chemical changes that sometimes occur as fruits are heated. It is harmless and won't affect flavor!

Also, avoid storing canned food near heat sources such as a furnace, water heater, hot water or sunny areas. Jars need to be kept cool and dark for longer storage life and to protect against spoilage. Be sure to store in a dry place. If the lid or band rusts, that can cause the seal to break.

Step 6 - Process the jars in the water bath

Keep the sealed jars covered with at least 2 inches of water. Keep the water boiling. Boil them for at 15 minutes (see the chart below). 

 

Recommended process time for Hot-Pack Canning Pineapple in a boiling-water canner.
Jar Size Process Time at Altitudes of
  0 - 1,000 ft 1,001 - 3,000 ft 3,001 - 6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Pints 15 min 20 20 25
Quarts 20 min 25 30 35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 7 - Done

Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool without touching or bumping them in a draft-free place (usually takes overnight)  You can then remove the rings if you like, but if you leave them on, at least loosen them quite a bit, so they don't rust in place due to trapped moisture. Once the jars are cool, you can check that they are sealed verifying that the lid has been sucked down. Just press in the center, gently, with your finger. If it pops up and down (often making a popping sound), it is not sealed. If you put the jar in the refrigerator right away, you can still use it. Some people replace the lid and reprocess the jar, then that's a bit iffy. If you heat the contents back up, re-jar them (with a new lid) and the full time in the canner, it's usually ok.

Once cooled, they're ready to store.   I find they last about 18 months.  After that, the get darker in color and start to get runny. They are safe to eat, but the flavor is bland.  So eat them in the first 12 to 18 months after you prepare them!

 

Other Equipment:

From left to right:

  1. Jar lifting tongs 
            to pick up hot jars
  2. Lid lifter 
            - to remove lids from the pot 
            of boiling water (sterilizing )
  3. Lid 
           - disposable - you may only 
           use them once
  4. Ring 
          - holds the lids on the jar until after
          the jars cool - then you don't need them
  5. Canning jar funnel
          - to fill the jars

 

You can get all of the tools in a kit here:

 

   
Ball home canning kit water bath canner

Home Canning Kits

This is the same type of standard canner that my grandmother used to make everything from applesauce to jams and jellies to tomato and spaghetti sauce. This complete kit includes everything you need and lasts for years: the canner, jar rack, jar grabber tongs, lid lifting wand, a plastic funnel, labels, bubble freer, and the bible of canning, the Ball Blue Book. It's much cheaper than buying the items separately. You'll never need anything else except jars & lids (and the jars are reusable)! There is also a simple kit with just the canner and rack, and a pressure canner, if you want to do vegetables (other than tomatoes). To see more canners, of different styles, makes and prices, click here!
 


Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Usually ships in 1-2 business days

Canning books

Canning & Preserving for Dummies
by Karen Ward
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Usually ships in 24 hours

Price:   $11.89
You Save:   $5.10 (30%)



The Ball Blue Book of Preserving

This is THE book on canning!  My grandmother used this book when I was a child.  It tells you in simple instructions how to can almost anything; complete with recipes for jam, jellies, pickles, sauces, canning vegetables, meats, etc.  If it can be canned, this book likely tells you how! Click on the link below for more information and / or to buy (no obligation to buy)

Click here for more information from Amazon.com about the
Ball Blue Book of Preserving  



Summary - Cost of Making Homemade Canned Pineapple - makes 10 jars of 8 oz each*

Item Quantity Cost in 20012 Source Subtotal
Oranges 8 medium or large sized $2.00 Grocery store $2.00
Lemons 2 $1.00 Grocery Store $1.00
Canning jars (8 oz size), includes lids and rings 10 jars $6.50/dozen Grocery stores (Publix, Kroger, Safeway, etc.) $5.50
Sugar 4 cups $2.00  Grocery stores (Publix, Kroger, Safeway, etc.) $2.00
Pectin (low sugar, dry) 1 and a third boxes $2.00 per box Grocery stores (Publix, Kroger, Safeway, etc.) $2.70
Total $13.20 total
 or about  $1.32 per jar

* - This assumes you already have the pots, pans, ladles, and reusable equipment. Note that you can reuse the jars!  Many products are sold in jars that will take the lids and rings for canning.  For example, Classico Spaghetti sauce is in quart sized jars that work with Ball and Kerr lids and rings. Note that the Classico's manufacturer does not recommend reuse of their jars: see what they have to say on this page:

Can't find the equipment?  We ship to all 50 states! Use our Feedback form!

Answers to Common Questions

If you want to learn how NOT to make marmalade, read this entertaining account from this Australian woman who is either incredibly cheap or a slow learner... but either way, it's a funny story!

And if our recipe is too EASY for you and you would like a much more complicated approach that will take about 4 hours to complete, try Delia Smith's (a cook who is famous in the UK) pineapple jam recipe!

 

Don't forget about us in the Spring for pick your own strawberries, vegetables oand other fruit! See our companion websites, www.pickyourownchristmastree.org for choose and cut Christmas tree farms and PumpkinPatchesAndMore.org to find a corn maze, hay ride and more in October!

Remember to ALWAYS call the farm or orchard BEFORE you go - weather, heavy picking and business conditions can always affect their hours and crops!

All images and text © Copyright © Benivia, LLC 2004,2005, 2006, 2007   Disclaimer
Permission is given to link to any page on www.pickyourown.org
Questions, corrections, suggestions or want to recommend a farm to add? Click on: 
How to Add a Farm to PickYourOwn.org or Write me at